Manning/Dunn Hyde County NC Genealogy

East Carolina Genealogy and more!

Archie as he is known among football fans...After the genealogy read about Manning relations in Nobility and Literature!

In 1971 Elisha Archibald "Archie" Manning was the second player chosen in the NFL draft. I was seven years old at the time. My father (T. Deering Manning) is semi-retired after 50+ years as a preacher. In 1971 dad was the preacher at First Christian Church of Carollton Georgia. Being a poor preachers child is not all that different from being the child of any other fella, except people always tell you you are a typical wild PK - (preachers kid), and when you do your best to live up to the moniker then they all point fingers and gossip about how the preachers kid is soooo baaaad....mom was a Saint for not shooting anyone! One of the biggest differences growing up a PK is that your phone rings all the time with people who need help in some sort of way, and you always seem to have someone living with you. It's amazing how many call wanting help, but how few call to help. 

I distinctly remember the phone ringing around 3 AM fall 1971. The next morning at breakfast I asked dad "who called so late". He chuckled and said some football player called up and when dad answered he said "Uncle Deering". Dad responded that he was not this fellas uncle...then the guy on the phone said that he had just got through playing a football game in Atlanta (about 45 mintues east of Carollton, Ga). The caller said that after his games he calls people to whom he is related to research is family line...you guessed it...this guy was drunk off his rocker.

Up until that time I had never really paid any attention to football unless my older brother was throwing one at my head. From then on and for many years after I watched Archie play thinking that he was indeed my cousin. Since then I have performed research on the Manning line and yet the actual truth evades me still.

I now have doubt that Archie was not at the other end of the phone line in 1971, but I also realize that Archie has to be a cousin in some manner just by way of his last name. I still would like to share with him the story though...

Moses Manning (1735 to 1810), married Keziah Lott Manning. Along with their sons they moved from New Kent County Virginia to South Carolina some time in the 1700s. From there the line leads to Elisha Archibald Manning. A Richard Elam Manning moved from Latta South Carolina across the country to Copiah Mississipi.

About the time that Richard Elam was born, Marcum Lott Manning shows up in the Census living in Bertie County NC. Solomon Manning (born 1803) shows up in the 1830 census in neighboring Beaufort County, NC. The issue is the lack of definite data idntifying Solomon Mannings father. Solomon is my GGGGrandfather.

The date of his birth and the timing of the move tends to indicate that Marcum Lott Manning is a very good candidate to be Solomons father. If so that makes Archie Manning my 6th cousin. Just as possible it could be that Solomon was a nephew to Marcum Lott Manning by way of one Marcum Lotts' brothers discussed as follows:

Joseph Manning was born 1770. He moved to Butler County Alabama and died in 1840; so it's not likely him.

Mark Manning was born 1764. He served in the Revolutionary War, moved to Walker County, Texas; and died in 1850; so it's not likely him.

William Manning was born 1763. He married Margaret and moved to Glynn County, Georgia where he died; so it's not likely him. 

Martin Manning was born 1759. He died in 1796, so it can't be him.

Moses Manning was born 1755. He died in 1817 and was 48 when Solomon was born. Could be him, but not likely.

Marcum Lott Manning was born 1766. He was 37 when Solomon was born. The 1790 Census has him in Georgetown SC. Military records show him during 1812 in the 2nd North Carolina Regiment in Martin County, NC; which neighbors Bertie County. Marcum Lott is the only one that is the right age and also in North Carolina. Although circumstantial Marcum Lott Manning seems to be the only one that could be Solomon's father given the age and proof that he was in the eastern North Carolina area where Solomon eventually settled.

If I am correct then Archie Manning is my 6th cousin.

Who knows...well...I do...sort of!

After testing my dad's DNA (Theodore Deering Manning), we are genetically linked to Moses Manning. Numerous results have been found with other descendants of Moses Manning having the same Y-DNA markers being R1b1a2. Hopefully one day the exact link will be identified.

If you are a Manning in this line please have your DNA tested to 67 or 111 markers so we can compare results.

Following the genealogy data, read more about the Mannings relations in Nobility and Literature.

After this is an Anecdotal Account of Lieuitenant Manning during the Revolutionary War and occurrences leading to the defeat of Colonel Fyle. I found it interesting to say the least!

Additional data is included on Mannings of Pennsylvania and their accomplishments.

1-Symon Manning (1235-)
+Tyraphena  (-)
. .2-Stephen Manning (1270-1310)
. .+uk  (-)
. .. .3-William Manning (1301-1342)
. .. .+Chryfold  (1315-)
. .. .. .4-Simon Manning (1335-)
. .. .. .+
Catherine Chaucer (1345-) (sister to Geoffrey Chaucer)
. .. .. .. .5-Johannes "John" Manning (1365-1412)
. .. .. .. .+Alicia Walden (1371-)
. .. .. .. .. .6-Johannes "John" Manning (1399-1435)
. .. .. .. .. .+Julianna Brockhill (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .7-Hugh Manning (1431-1502)
. .. .. .. .. .. .+Margaret Brandon (1440-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .8-Johannes "John" Manning (1480-10 May 1542)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Agnes Petly (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .9-George Manning (1520-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .9-Johannes Manning, Jr (1528-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .9-Richard Manning (1544-8 May 1582)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Agnes  (1548-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .10-Thomas Manning (25 January 1562-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Margery Johnson (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .11-Thomas Manning, Jr (maybe 1585-maybe 1676)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Susanna Taylor (maybe 1573-1684)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .12-John Manning (1615-1672)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Lydia Richardson (1617-1700)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .13-Mary Manning (1637-1655+)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .13-Margaret Manning (1639-1733)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .13-Thomas Manning (1641-1732)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+uk uk (1643-1732)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .14-Solomon Manning (1665-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Ann  (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .15-Solomon Manning (1736-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .15-William Manning (1738-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .15-Thomas Manning (1740-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .14-John Manning, III (1667-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .14-Thomas Manning, Jr (1669-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .14-Sarah Manning (1671-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .13-John Manning (1650-1716)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Sarah Morton (1643-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Sarah Wattford (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .14-John Manning (1685-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Mary Rowse (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .14-Joseph Manning (1687-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Martha  (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .14-William Manning (1689-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Margaret  Markham (1690-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .15-Matthias Manning (1706-1795)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Margaret  (1708-1789)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .16-Matthias Manning (1736-1782)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Selah Pridgen (1730-maybe 1770)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .14-Thomas Manning (1691-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Sarah Taylor (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .15-Moses Manning (1710-2 January 1791)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Lydia Smith (1709-after 1791)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .16-Martin Manning (1733-1795)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .16-Macey Melea Manning (1735-Dead)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .16-Sarah Manning (1737-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Robert Jarvis (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .16-Macey Melea Manning (1735-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .16-
Marcum Lott Manning (1739-12 March 1810)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Nicely Sommerset (1740-1826)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Melea "Mealy" Manning (1757-1796)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Sarah Rogers (1760-14 January 1838)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-John Manning (1783-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Letitia Lee (1785-1841)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Elisha Manning (17 Oc 1803-1 Sept 1866)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Melea Manning (20 Feb 1805-26 March 1862)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-John Manning (1806-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Woodward Manning (2 Jan 1808-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Letitia Manning (1812-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Ira Manning (1813-1870)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-James E H L Manning (11 Jan 1817-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Mary Manning (1823-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Maranda Manning (28 Dec 1824-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-John Manning (1783-23 Nov 1844)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Letitia Lee (1785-1841)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Elisha Manning (17 Oct 1803-1 Sept 1866)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Rebecca Edwards (1809-1880)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Richard Elam Manning (10 May 1830-3 March 1916)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Elizabeth Ann Pevey (1834-1913)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-Martha L Manning (1854-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-Laura Manning (1856-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-Quitman Manning (1859-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-Mary Celeste Manning (1861-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-Susie Anna Manning (1861-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-Reece Warren Manning (1866-1920)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-John Dodds Manning (1869-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-Elisha Archibald Manning (23 Aug 1873-1952)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Annie Sophie Gaddy (1877-1944)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .22-Mamie Ruth Manning (1896-1968)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .22-Lucy Lee Manning (1898-1993)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .22-John Peyton Manning (1901-1979)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .22-Frank Stephen Manning (1907-1975)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .22-Elisha Archibald Manning (9 May 1910-1967)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+uk Nelson (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .23-Elisha Archibald Manning (19 May 1949-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Olivia  Williams (1961-October 2006)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .24-C Manning (1974-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .24-P Manning (1976-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .24-E Manning (1981-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-John C Manning (1829-1894)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Joseph Manning (1831-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-David Manning (1833-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Ira Manning (1835-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Moses Manning (1836-1880)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Sarah Manning (1839-1908)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Mark Manning (1841-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Elizabeth Manning (1843-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Margaret Manning (1845-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Woodward Manning (1847-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Mary Manning (1849-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-William Manning (1763-1810)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Margaret  (about 1767-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Marcum Lot "Mark" Manning (1766-1842)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Margaret Landers Spalding (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Annis Manning (1775-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Edward  Jackson, Jr (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Mary Manning (1779-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Joseph Manning (1770-Dead)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Martin Manning (about 1759-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Moses Manning (1763-4 January 1817)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Faith Sarah Reedy (1764-6 March 1831)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-Joseph Manning (1797-26 November 1859)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-Keziah Manning (1800-1880)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-John Manning (1807-1886)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Mary A Burney (1814-1896)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-John Manning (1844-1924)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Child Manning (1836-1836)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Lewis P Manning (1838-1910)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Mary Ann Brown (1844-1918)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Mary Manning (1860-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Alexander Manning (1862-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Aaron Mitchel Manning (1866-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Isaac Manning (1839-1920)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Moses Manning (1841-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Susan Manning (1842-1923)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-James W Manning (1846-1916)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Lorenzy Manning (1849-6 February 1862)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Harriet Manning (1852-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-Martin Jerald Manning (1804-1882)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-Annis Manning (1787-1874)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-Moses Manning (1795-1891)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-Joseph Revard Manning (1793-1815)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-William Gerarde Manning (1789-1815)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-William Manning (1800-1888)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-Shadrack Manning (1805-1884)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-John S Manning (1809-1901)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-Jackson Monroe Manning (1801-8 September 1863)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Sarah Purceley (1823-1885)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-John Manning (1860-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Martha Jane Manning (1863-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Abasila Manning (1865-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-Melchisadek Aaron Manning (1790-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Diannah Manning (1764-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Joseph Manning (1770-1830)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Martin David Manning (1762-May 1780)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Joseph Manning (1770-Dead)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .16-Merit Manning (1739-Dead)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .16-Merena Manning (1741-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .16-Moses Manning, II R.S. (1731-12 March 1810)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Kessiah "Kezzie" Lott (1737-1810)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Moses Manning, III R.S. (1755-4 January 1817)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Martha  (1763-6 March 1831)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Melea "Mealy" Manning (1757-1796)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Sarah Rogers (1760-14 January 1838)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-John Manning (1783-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Letitia Lee (1785-1841)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Elisha Manning (17 October 1803-1 September 1866)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Melea Manning (20 February 1805-26 March 1862)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-John Manning (1806-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Woodward Manning (2 January 1808-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Letitia Manning (1812-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Ira Manning (1813-1870)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-James E H L Manning (11 January 1817-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Mary Manning (1823-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Maranda Manning (28 December 1824-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-John Manning (1783-23 November 1844)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Letitia Lee (1785-1841)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .19-Elisha Manning (17 October 1803-1 September 1866)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Rebecca Edwards (1809-1880)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-
Richard Elam Manning (10 May 1830-3 March 1916)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Elizabeth Ann Pevey (1834-1913)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-Martha L Manning (1854-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-Laura Manning (1856-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-Quitman Manning (1859-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-Mary Celeste Manning (1861-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-Susie Anna Manning (1861-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-Reece Warren Manning (1866-1920)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-John Dodds Manning (1869-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .21-Elisha Archibald Manning (23 August 1873-1952)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Annie Sophie Gaddy (1877-1944)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .22-Mamie Ruth Manning (1896-1968)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .22-Lucy Lee Manning (1898-1993)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .22-John Peyton Manning (1901-1979)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .22-Frank Stephen Manning (1907-1975)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .22-Elisha Archibald Manning (9 May 1910-1967)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+uk Nelson (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .23-
Elisha Archibald Manning (19 May 1949-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Olivia  Williams (1961-October 2006)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .24-C Manning (1974-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .24-P Manning (1976-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .24-E Manning (1981-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-John C Manning (1829-1894)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Joseph Manning (1831-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-David Manning (1833-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Ira Manning (1835-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Moses Manning (1836-1880)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Sarah Manning (1839-1908)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Mark Manning (1841-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Elizabeth Manning (1843-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Margaret Manning (1845-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Woodward Manning (1847-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .20-Mary Manning (1849-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Martin Manning (1759-1796)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-William Manning R.S. (1763-1810)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Margaret Culpeper (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-William Manning, Jr (1799-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Elizabeth  Beasley (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-Shadrack Manning (1805-1854)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Martha Ann Burney (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .18-Job Manning (1806-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Maridy Hair (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Joseph Manning (1770-1830)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Annis Manning (1775-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Edward  Jackson, Jr (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .17-Mary Manning (1779-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+William Jackson (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .15-Samuel Manning (1712-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .15-Mary Manning (1722-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+James Granberry (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .12-Edward Manning (maybe 1616-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .12-Thomas Manning, III (maybe 1617-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Mirian Botley (1561-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .+Thomazina Trady (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .9-Hugh Manning (-)
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .8-Richard Manning (1482-)
. .. .. .. .. .6-Doctor Manning (-)
. .. .. .. .. .6-Hugo Manning (-)
. .. .. .. .. .6-Catarina Manning (-)
. .. .3-Robert Manning (1302-)
. .2-Robert Manning (1272-)
. .2-Eylmer Manning (1274-) 

MANNINGS IN NOBILITY AND LITERATURE 

Rudolf de Manning, or Ranulph de Mannheim married Elgida whose nephew was King Harold I of England. Because of his marriage, Rudolf received a grant of land in Kent, England. Elgida and Rudolf had a son named Symon, who accompanied King Richard the Lion Hearted as the first baron to accompany him in the second crusade in the 1190s. Because of this he was knighted on the battlefield. His offspring Symon is noted in the lineage above.

Another Simon Manning (b. circa 1345) married the younger sister of Geoffrey Chaucer, the famous author who wrote a lot literature which we were forced to study in school. They were married in about 1364. Thank heaven, the English language has changed a lot since then.

Harold Harefoot, or Harold I, (c. 1015–17 March 1040) was King of England from 1035 to 1040. His cognomen "Harefoot" referred to his speed, and the skill of his huntsmanship (Just maybe this is where Archie Manning got his speed and football skills). He was the son of Cnut the Great, king of England, Denmark, and Norway by Ælfgifu of Northampton. Though there was some scepticism he was really Cnut's son, this was probably just propaganda by the opponents of his kingship.

Harthacnut's reign

Upon Cnut's death (12 November 1035), Harold's younger half-brother Harthacnut, the son of Cnut and his queen, Emma of Normandy, was legitimate heir to the thrones of both the Danes and the English. He was, however, unable to travel to his coronation, because his Danish kingdom was under threat of invasion by King Magnus I of Norway and King Anund Jacob of Sweden. England's magnates favoured the idea of installing Harold Harefoot temporarily as regent, due to the difficulty of Harthacnut's absence, and despite the opposition of Godwin, the Earl of Wessex, and the Queen, he eventually wore the crown.

Harold survived an attempt to unseat him led by Ælfred Ætheling and Edward the Confessor, Emma's sons by the long-dead Æthelred the Unready, in 1036. Harold died at Oxford on 17 March 1040, just as Harthacnut was preparing an invasion force of Danes, and was buried at the abbey of Westminster. His body was subsequently exhumed, beheaded, and thrown into a fen bordering the Thames when Harthacnut assumed the throne in June, 1040. His supporters later rescued the body, to be buried in a church which was fittingly named St. Clement Danes.

Assumes the throne

The runestone Sm 42, in Småland, Sweden, mentions Harold Harefoot.

In 1037, Emma of Normandy fled to Bruges, in Flanders, and Harold "was everywhere chosen as king". Harold himself is somewhat obscure; the historian Frank Stenton considered it probable that his mother Ælfgifu was "the real ruler of England" for part or all of his reign.

With the north at least on Harold's side, in adherence to the terms of a deal, which Godwin was part of, Emma was settled in Winchester, with Harthacnut's huscarls. Harold soon "sent and had taken from her all the best treasures" of Cnut the Great, and the Kingdom of England was practically his.

According to the Encomium Emmae, though, the Archbishop of Canterbury refused to crown Harold Harefoot. There is evidence that Ælfgifu of Northampton was attempting to secure her son's position through bribes to the nobles. 

Alfred and Edward's invasion

In 1036, Alfred Atheling, Emma's son by the long dead Æthelred, returned to the kingdom from exile in Normandy with his brother Edward the Confessor, with some show of arms. With his bodyguard, according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle he intended to visit his mother, Emma, in Winchester, but he may have made this journey for anything other than a family reunion. As the "murmur was very much in favour of Harold", Alfred was captured on the direction of Godwin, now apparently on Harold's side at this point, and the men loyal to Harefoot blinded him. He subsequently died soon after due to the severity of the wounds, his bodyguard similarly treated.

Offspring

Harold apparently had a son, Ælfwine, who became a monk on the continent when he was older. Ælfgifu of Northampton disappears with no trace after 1040. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Harold Harefoot ruled for 4 years and 16 weeks, by which calculation he would have begun ruling two weeks after the death of Cnut.

Anecdotal Account of Lieutenant Manning during the Revolutionary War

Note: Lieutenant Laurence Manning was the Father of Richard Irvine Manning Governor of South Carolina and for whom Manning South Carolina is named.


LIEUTENANT LAURENCE MANNING, AND OCCURRENCES LEADING TO THE DEFEAT OF COLONEL FYLE.

That important consequfnces have resulted from accidental occurrences, and that achievements have been attributed to foresight and judgment, which originated in some fortuitous incident, cannot be doubted. Tlie following Anecdote may possibly be dis-believed by some, yet I must record it as doing honour to a fellow-soldier, to whom I was bound by the strictest ties of friendship.

No man who knew Manning would question his veracity, and from his lips I received it. Nor is it credible, that he would wander into the regions of romance to exalt his reputation, when by the uniformity of his conduct, he was daily
adding to tlie laurels universally acknowledged to be his due. I have besides, in my possession, a letter from my highly valued friend. Judge Johnson of Abingdon, Virginia, at the period of its occurrence, an Officer in the Legion, corroborating the principal fact, though slightly differing in the detail. Witli regard to the
worth and abilities of Manning, his coolness and intrejulity, our sentiments are tlie same. His delineation of his talents and character I regard as perfect. " I
never," says the Judge, " knew any man who was more remarkable for that quality, which is called presence of mind. The more sudden the emergency, the
greater the danger in which he was unexpectedly placed, the more perfect was his self-possession, as lated to the faculties both of body and mind. In corporal vigour and activity, he was exceeded by few and there was an ardour about him, which characterised every thing that he said or did. If he had enjoyed the advantages of literary culture, he would have been as muchi the object of our admiration every where else, as he was in scenes of danger and military ad-
venture."

Most of the settlers in North Carolina, in the neighbourhood of Cross Creek, now Fayetteville, were emigrants from Scotland, who had brought with them strong prejudices in favour of monarchy. Few among them had imbibed the spirit of Liberty, fostered with with enthusiasm by almost the entire population in
their adopted country; but, to the credit of such as professed attachment, it must be remembered, that having once declared in favour of the cause of America, none more courageously, zealously, and faithfully supported it. To Scotland, we owe many a gallant Soldier. No other foreign nation contributed so many distinguished Officers in the line of our armies as Scotland. The intrepid Mercer sealed his devotion to our cause with his blood, and died in battle. Lord
Slerlin, Generals W Dougald, Sinclair, Stephens, McIntosh, and Davie, were among the most gallant and strenuous champions of Independence. Knowing
these facts, it cannot be imagined, that I could ever cherish or utter a sentiment injurious to a country to which I feel the strongest attachment, and from which
I ain proud to have derived my origin. A country, whose sons are brave, and daughters virtuous; where beauty is adorned with its most fascinating perfections, and manhood exhibits a vigour and activity that cannot be surpassed; where industry has produced an almost irtcredible influx of wealth, and the energies of mind an increase of literary acquirement, that places
human knowledge on an eminence that it had never before attained; a country where, as a student in a College of celebrity, I, for four successive years, listened with delight to the eloquence of the amiable and enlightened Miller, teaching, how far more congenial to the best feelings of the heart, and productive of happiness to man, is the purity of genuine Republicanism, than any system of government that the world has ever known. Where I studied the theory of morals, and witnessed the perfection of their practice, under the immediate protection and tuition of the first of Philosophers, and most virtuous of men, the immortal Dr. Thomas Reid. Where Jardine, the teacher of Eloquence, honoured me with his friendship; and the liberal kindness of other Professors, of the inhabitants of the city, generally, gave birth to sentiments of gratitude and affection, that can never be effaced. Truly, then, I can assert, that prejudices are unknown in the following narrative:

The intrigues and efforts of Lord Cornwallis, to excite insurrection, backed by a very formidable force, had produced among the Highland emigrants a spirit
of revolt, which it required all the energies of General Greene to counteract, before it could be matured. The zeal and activity of Lieutenant Colonel Lee,
whose usefulness exceeded calculation, united to his acutcness and happy talent of obtaining intelligence of every movement, and of the most secret intentions of the enemy, pointed him out as the fittest man for this important service. He was accordingly selected, with orders to impede the intercourse of Lord Cornwallis with the disaffected; to repress every symptom of revolt, and promptly to cut off every party that should take up arms for Britain. Constantly on the alert, and equally solicitous to give security to his own command, while
he harassed the enemy. A secure position -was, on one occasion, taken near a forked road, one division of which led directly to Lord Cornwallis' camp, about
six miles distant. The ground was chosen in the dusk of evening ; and to prevent surprise, patrols of cavalry were kept out on each fork during the night. An
order for a movement before day had been communicated to every individual, and was executed with so iittle noise and confusion, that Lieutenant Manning,
waking at early dawn, found himself, excepting one Soldier, left alone. Stephen Green, the attendant of Captain Cams, lay near him, resting on the portmanteau of his superior, and buried in profound sleep.


Being awakened, he was ordered to mount and follow, while Manning, hastening towards the fork, hoped to fall upon the track, and speedily rejoin his regiment.
Much rain had fallen during the night, so that, finding both roads equally cut up. Manning chose at hazard, and took the wrong one. He had not proceeded far,
before he saw at the door of a log-house, a rifleman leaning on his gun, and apparently placed as a centinel. Gallopping up to him, he inquired if a regiment of horse and body of infantry had passed that way? Oh, ho," cried the man, (whistling loudly, which brought out a dozen others completely armed, and
carrying each a red rag in his hat,) " you, I suppose, are one of Greene's men." The badge which they bore, marked their principles. Without the slightest
indication of alarm, or even hesitation. Manning pointed to the portmanteau carried by Green, and exclaimed — " Hush, my good fellow — no clamour for
God's sake — I have there what will ruin Greene — point out the ro^d to Lord Cornwallis' army, for all depends up(m early intelligence of its contents." " You are an honest fellow, (was the general cry) and have left the rebels just in time, for the whole settlement are in arms to join Colonel Pyle to-morrow, (naming the place of rendezvous) where Colonel Tarleton will meet and conduct us to camp." " Come," said the man, to whom he had first spoken, " take a drink — Here's confusion to Greene, and success to the King and his friends. This is the right road, and you will soon reach the army ; or rather let me conduct you to it
myself." " Not for ihe world, my dear fellow," replied Manning " your direction is plain and I can follow it. I will never consent, that a faithful subject of his Majesty should be subjected to the dangers of captivity or death on my account. If we should fall in with a party of rebels, and we cannnot say that they are not in the neighbourhood now, we should both lose our lives. I should be hanged for desertion, and you for aiding me to reach the British army." This speech produced the effect he desired. The libation concluded, Manning rode off amid the cheers of the company, and when out of sight, crossed to the other road, and urging his horse to full speed, in a short time overtook and communicated the interesting intelligence to his commander.

Lee was then meditating an attack upon Tarleton, who had crossed the Haw River to support the Insurgents; but, perceiving the vast importance of crushing the revolt in the bud, he informed General Greene of his plan by a confidential messenger, and hastened to the point of rendezvous, where Pyle, with upwards of four hundred men, had already arrived. It is unnecessary to detail the sanguinary scene which followed. Pyle, completely deceived, and to the last believing the Legionary Dragoons the soldiers of Tarleton, was overpowered, and, with a considerable portion of his force, became victims of credulity.

It has been remarked, that "severity at first is often humanity in the end." Its policy, on this occasion, scarcely be denied. As Lee permitted no pursuit,
many escaped, and speading universal alarm, so completely crushed the spirit of revolt, that opposition to government was put at once and effectually to rest.
But had the Insurgents been cut off to a man, would not the act have been justified on the score of retaliation ? The provocation would have sanctioned it. To Colonel Buford, but a little before, Tarleton had refused capitulation. Deaf to the voice of clemency, and intent on slaughter, a charge was made on an un-
prepared and unresisting foe. His heart was steeled against the claims of mercy, and, as Lee has forcibly said, " it needed but the Indian war-dance, and roasting fire, to have placed the tragedy which followed, first in the records of tortnre and death."

Many other proofs could be adduced of Manning's presence of mind, and cool intrepidity in action. It is grateful to me to mention one of these. At the battle
of Eutaw, after the British line had been broken, and the Old Buffs, a regiment that had boasted of the extraordinary feats that they were to perform, were
running from the field, Manning, in the enthusiasm of that valour for which he was so eminently distinguished, sprang forward in pursuit, directing the platoon which he commanded to follow him. He did not cast an eye behind him until he found himself near a large brick house, into which the York Volunteers,
commanded by Cruger, were retiring. The British were on all sides of him, and not an American Soldier nearer than one hundred and fifty or two hundred yards. He did not hesitate a moment, but springing at an Officer who was near him, seized him by the collar, and exclaiming in a harsh tone of voice " Damn you, sir, you are my prisoner," wrested his sword from his grasp, dragged him by force from the house, and keeping his body as a shield of defence from the heavy fire sustained from the windows, carried him off without receiving any injury. Manning has often related, that at the moment when he expected that his prisoner would have made an effort for liberty, he, with great solemnity, commenced an enumeration of his titles "I am Sir, Henry Barry, Deputy Adjutant General of the British Army, Captain in the 52d Regiment, Secretary to the Com-
mandant of Charleston." " Enough, enough, sir," said the victor, "you are just the man I was looking for; fear nothing for your life, you shall screen me
from danger, and I will take special care of you."

He had retired in this manner some distance from the brick house, when he saw Captain Robert Joiett of the Virginia line, engaged in single combat with a
British Officer. They had selected each other for battle a little before, the American armed with a broad sword, the Briton with a musket and bayonet. As
they came together, a thrust was made at Joiett, which he happily parried, and both dropping their artificial weapons, being too much in contact to use them with effect, resorted to those with which they had been furnished by nature. They were both men of great bulk and vigour, and while struggling, each anxious
to bring his adversary to the ground, a grenadier who saw the contest, ran to the assistsnce of his Officer, made a longe with his bayonet, missed Joiett's body,
but drove it beyond the curve into his coat. In attempting to withdraw the entangled weapon, he threw both the combatants to the ground; when get-
ting it free, he raised it deliberately, determined not to fail again in his purpose, but to transfix Joiett. It was at this crisis that Manning approached — not near
enough, however, to reach the grenadier with his arm.

In order to gain time, and to arrest the stroke, he exclaimed in an angry and authoritative tone — " You damn'd brute, will you murder the gentleman?" The
Soldier, supposing himself addressed by one of his own Officers, suspended the contemplated blow, and looked around to see the person who had thus spoken
to him. Before he could recover from the surprise with which he had been thrown, Manning, now sufficiently near, smote him with his sword across the
eyes, and felled him to the ground; while Joiett disengaged himself from his opponent, and snatching up the musket, as he attempted to rise, laid him dead by a blow from the butt end of it. Manning was of inferior size, but strong and remarkably well formed. Joiett, literally speaking, a giant. This, probably, led Barry, who could not have wished the particulars of his capture to be commented on, to reply, when asked by his brother Officers, how he came to be taken, " I was overpowered by a huge Virginian."*

The reputation of a Soldier, so highly distinguished both for valour and discernment, whose firmness enabled him, in all emergencies, to maintain a composure that neither difficulty nor danger could disturb, has caused the honour of giving birth to Manning to be claimed both by Ireland and America. If my re-
collection is accurate, he certainly declared himself a native of Carlisle in Pennsylvania. Yet, when I remember the general tenor of his conversation — " the facility he possessed of involving in obscurity, the subject he meant to elucidate" — the accent on his tongue — the peculiar turn of his expression — his calling for example to his servant, walking with naked feet over ground covered by a heavy frost — " Shall I never teach you discretion. Drone! — If you will go
barefoot, why the Devil don't you put on your blue stockings." And on another occasion, returning to camp, and looking at a bottle of spirits, half emptied,
which he had left full — " Speak quickly, Drone, you big thief, and tell me what you have done with the remainder of my liquor ?" My opinion is staggered,
and I am inclined to acknowledge the superior claims of Ireland.

* Henry Barry was an eccentric character. He aimed at singularity in words as well as actions. He would send "his beitermost kind of compliments" to a lady; and, in a simple flower, present " the sweetest of all possible flowers." But in nothing was his conduct regarded as so farcical, as in his claim to delicate and liberal feelings. On one occasion, it has been stated, that reading a Poem, of his own composition, on the blessings of Liberty, a gentleman present asked him frankly,  "How his actions could be so much at variance with the principles he professed ?" " Because, Sir," he unblushingly replied, " I am a Soldier of Fortune, seeking a snug and comfortable establishment. My feelings are as delicate as yours, or any other man's; but 1 never suffer myself to be humbugged by them." The day at Eutaw was certainly not his fighting day; but he is said to have distinguished himself in India. 

Manning, at the conclusion of the war, married into a highly respectable family, and settled in South Carolina. His attachment to a military life continuing
unabated, he became a candidate for the appointment of Adjutant General of the Militia of the State, obtained it, and performed the important duties attached
to it, with the applause of the public, till his death.

http://www.archive.org/stream/anecdotesofrevol00gard/anecdotesofrevol00gard_djvu.txt  

  BIO: HON. HARRY MANNING & other MANNING families, Cumberland County,  

  Pennsylvania. Contributed for use in the USGenWeb Archives by Joe Patterson

 Copyright 2004.  All rights reserved.

  http://www.usgwarchives.net/copyright.htm

  http://www.usgwarchives.net/pa/cumberland/

  _____________________________________________________________


  From Biographical Annals of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania,

  Chicago: The Genealogical Publishing Co., 1905, pages 217-223

  _____________________________________________________________


  NOTE: Use this web address to access other bios:

  http://www.usgwarchives.net/pa/cumberland/zeamer/

  

     HON. HARRY MANNING. The Mannings are of English descent and came to

  America at various times, some at a very early date. Capt. John Manning, a

  soldier in the British army, was at Boston as early as 1656. In 1664 he came to

  New York, where later his government granted him the island in the East river

  that is now known as Blackwell's island. Formerly it was known as Manning's

  Island.

  

    A Robert Manning, who was born at Salem, Mass., and died there in 1842,

  achieved great distinction as a pomologist. He had a sister Elizabeth who

  became the mother of Nathaniel Hawthorne, who was educated at the

  expense of  Mr. Manning.

 

    A William Manning who was born in England settled at Cambridge, Mass., in

  1692. He descended from an ancient family who had their origin in Saxony,

  Germany, and settled in England in the fourth century. This member of the

  family was extensively interested in navigation, was prominent in the church

  and became the founder of a large American posterity. He was one of the

  selectmen of Cambridge and by appointment of the Colonial government he and

  Deacon John Cooper directed the erection of Harvard hall, and collected and

  disbursed the moneys that were raised for its construction.

 

    A James Manning, who was born at Elizabeth, N. J., in 1738, graduated from

  Princeton with the second honors of his class, became a Baptist minister and

  figured prominently as a preacher and educator in the colony of Rhode Island

  during the Revolutionary period. He represented Rhode Island in the Congress

  of the Confederation after the Revolution and it was largely through his

  influence that Rhode Island eventually came into the Union.

 

    Randolph Manning, who was born in Plainfield, N. J., became a lawyer in New

  York City. He afterward settled in Pontiac, Mich., and was a delegate to the

  first Constitutional Convention of that State; also served as State senator,

  as secretary of State, as chancellor of the State and as associate justice of

  the Supreme court of the State. He was a descendant of Jeffrey Manning, who

  settled in New Jersey as early as 1676.

 

    Richard Irving Manning, who was born in Clarendon, S. C., in 1789, served

  as a captain in the war of 1812, as a member of the Legislature, and

  afterward became governor of South Carolina. While governor he entertained

  at   his house Gen. LaFayette on the occasion of his second visit to this country.

  He afterward was elected Congressman and while holding that position died in

  Philadelphia in 1836. His wife bore the unusual distinction of being the wife

  of a governor, the sister of a governor, the niece of a governor, the mother

  of a governor, and the aunt and foster mother of a governor. Their oldest son

  married a daughter of Gen. Wade Hampton, served several years in the

  Assembly and Senate of South Carolina, and was elected governor in 1852. He

  was a delegate to the convention that nominated Buchanan for the Presidency

  and a member of the committee that notified him of his nomination. Mr. -

  Buchanan tendered him the mission to St. Petersburg, which he declined. In the

  Civil war he served on Gen. Beauregard's staff. In 1865 he was chosen United

  States senator, but was not permitted to take his seat. Lawrence Manning, the

  father of Richard Irving Manning, served in the Revolution under "Light Horse

  Harry" Lee, who mentions him in his "Memoirs."

 

    Thomas Courtland Manning, born in North Carolina, in 1831, became a lawyer

  and removed to Louisiana, where he had a distinguished and honorable career.

  In the Civil war he rose to the rank of lieutenant-colonel in the Confederate

  service, and later was appointed adjutant-general of the State with the rank

  of brigadier-general. In 1864 he was appointed an associate justice of the

  Supreme court of the State and served till the close of the war. In 1876 he

  was vice president of the National convention that nominated Samuel J. Tilden;

  in 1877 he was appointed chief justice of the Supreme court, serving until in

  1880. In 1882 he was a third time placed on the Supreme Bench and served until

  in 1886, when President Cleveland appointed him United States minister to

  Mexico, which post he held until his death, in 1887.

 

    A Jacob Merrill Manning, born at Greenwood, N. Y., in 1824, graduated at

  Amherst, became a distinguished clergyman in the Congregational church, and

  for a long time was pastor of Old South Church in Boston. He was chaplain to

  the Massachusetts State Senate, chaplain to the 43d Massachusetts Regiment in

  1862-63, for six years an overseer of Harvard, for seventeen years a trustee

  of the State library and for six years a lecturer at Andover Theological

  Seminary. He died in Portland, Maine, in 1882.

 

    Daniel Manning, born at Albany, N. Y., was educated in the public schools

  until in his twelfth year, when he entered the office of an Albany newspaper

  and rose step by step until he reached the position of president of the

  company that owned it. He also became director of several banks; president of

  the National Commercial Bank of Albany, and interested in a railroad. Becoming

  a leader in Democratic politics he rose to great prominence and influence and

  in 188 was appointed secretary of the treasury by President Cleveland.

 

    It is not the purpose of this article to show the relationship of these

  different branches of this distinguished family; but as it may be within the

  range of possibility to do so reference is made to them with the view of

  lending assistance to the genealogist of the future. Besides, it may also add

  interest to what the writer hereof has to relate about the Pennsylvania family

  that is the special subject of this sketch.

 

    The American progenitor of the Pennsylvania Mannings settled in Lancaster

  county some time prior to the war of the Revolution. He married a lady of

  German ancestry and both lived in that part of the State to the end of their

  days. Among his children was a son George who was born in Manor township,

  Lancaster county, sometime between the years 1788 and 1790. He married Mary

  Kendig, a member of a representative Lancaster county family, and

  subsequently moved to the vicinity of Middletown, Dauphin county. George and

  Mary (Kendig) Manning had the following children: John, Christian, Martin and

  Elizabeth. John, the oldest of these four children, was born in 1813, in

  Dauphin county. In 1832 he married Lydia Culp, of Lancaster county, whose

  mother was a Boughter, and the member of a family who rendered valiant

  service in the war of the Revolution. Soon after his marriage he began

  farming and farmed upon his father's farm near Middletown until in 1837, when

  he moved to Silver Spring township, Cumberland county, and followed farming

  there. In his latter years he engaged at milling with his son. He died on

  July i6, 1892; his wife, Lydia (Culp) Manning, died June 26, 1864, in the

  fifty-second year of her age, and the remains of both are buried in the

  graveyard of the Silver Spring Church. John and Lydia (Culp) Manning had

  seven children, viz.: Henry, born Oct. 29, 1834; Samuel, March 25, 1837 (died

  Jan. 20, 1840); Abraham, in 1839 (married Emma Leeds, of Carlisle); John, in

  1842 (married Emma Sanderson, of Newville); Sarah, in 1846 (married William

  Hauck, of Silver Spring township; died in January, 1904);

  Lillie, in 1852 (married Levi Baer, of Silver Spring township), and J.

  Anderson, who married Lucy Clepper. With a single exception all of their

  children were born in Silver Spring township, Cumberland county. Henry, the

  oldest child, was born near Middletown, Dauphin county, and nearly all his

  life was popularly known as Harry Manning. His childhood and youth were spent

  with his parents upon the farm, doing such work as usually falls to the lot of

  farmer boys and attending the country district school. When sixteen years of

  age he went to the milling trade, at which he served a two years'

  apprenticeship. He then went to Ohio and there worked at milling a year.

  Returning to Cumberland county, he worked a year in the mill of Thomas B.

  Bryson of Hampden township, and then began business on his own account at 

  the   Silver Spring Mill, located on the turnpike a short distance east of

  Hogestown. He then was not yet twenty-one years old, but he applied himself

  so diligently and tried so hard to please that he from the very start made

  good progress. In 1862 he formed a partnership with J. H. Singiseo, of

  Mechanicsburg, and bought the mill at the head of the Big Spring and jointly

  carried on a milling business there until in 1867, when Mr. Manning sold his

  interest to his partner and purchased the warehouse property at Oakdale. Here

  he engaged extensively in the grain and forwarding business, also handled coal

  and lumber, and achieved a wide reputation as an honorable and successful

  dealer. In 1891 he sold out at Oakville and a year afterward, with his son,

  entered upon the same line of business at Newville, where he continued until

  his death.

 

    Mr. Manning was essentially a business man, delighted in business, directed

  all his attention and energies upon his business enterprises and in every

  sense of the word was a successful business man. He was a Democrat both by

  inheritance and conviction, but up until in his latter years figured in

  politics only to serve his party and his friends. In the summer of 1896,

  after much pressure, he consented to stand as a candidate for the

  Legislature. He was nominated and elected and his official course was so

  satisfactory that two years afterward he was renominated and re-elected by a

  large vote. With the experience of his former term he returned to his post

  more zealous than ever to render to his constituency acceptable service, but

  just as the avenue was widening before him, beckoning him onward to greater

  usefulness and higher honors, an unseen hand stretched forth and removed him

  from earthly scenes forever. He died at his home in Newville on Jan. 27,

  1899, of pneumonia, after an illness of less than a week. His remains were

  interred on Jan. 30th in the cemetery of the Big Spring Presbyterian Church,

  the church with which he and his family affiliated. Among the large concourse

  present to pay their last respects were special committees from the Senate and

  House of Representatives at Harrisburg, besides many other members of both

  branches of the Legislature. The House subsequently held special memorial

  services, at which addresses were made and resolutions passed expressive of

  the high esteem held regarding the deceased. The Democratic Standing

  Committee of Cumberland county, at the first meeting it held after his death,

  also gave formal expression of the deceased's public services and high

  personal character.

 

    In person Mr. Manning was tall and spare, and in manner modest and

  reserved. He was not a product of the schools, but his long business experience

  and free intercourse with all classes of people gave him a training which served

  him well in whatever sphere he was called upon to act. He was not a man of

  many words, but when he spoke he expressed himself with a dignity and

  deliberation that gave his words peculiar weight and secured respectful

  attention.

 

    On Feb. 18, 1862, Mr. Manning was married to Margaret Beistline, at the hands

  of Rev. William H. Dinsmore, pastor of the Silver Spring Presbyterian Church.

  Margaret Beistline was a daughter of George and Sarah (Wynkoop) Beistline and

  a member of an old representative Silver Spring family. To their union two

  children were born, both sons: George, born Nov. 20, 1862, who died Oct. 20,

  1865; and Edgar S., who survives and with his mother comprises all that

  remains of the family of the late Hon. Harry Manning.

  

    HON. EDGAR STUART MANNING, son of Harry and Margaret (Beistline) Manning,

  was born at Oakville, Cumberland county, on Oct. 8, 1865. He grew to manhood

  in his native village and was ,educated in its public schools and in the

  Cumberland Valley State Normal School at Shippensburg. Besides these

  scholastic advantages he at the same time received a business training of a

  most practical kind. As soon as it was safe for him to go outside the front

  yard gate he was given the range of his father's office and warehouse, where

  he whiled away the leisure hours of his early years as in a playhouse,

  drinking in a knowledge of his father's business in the way of entertainment

  and recreation. By the same natural and easy gradation came the practice, and

  by the time he reached the years of young manhood he, by taste, habit,

  education and inheritance, was a grain and forwarding merchant, and in every

  sense qualified to share the cares and responsibilities of his father. He was

  given an interest in the business, the firm becoming H. Manning & Son. Manning

  & Son remained at Oakville until 1881, when they sold out with a view of

  finding a field in which they could operate upon a more extensive scale. In

  1892 they located at Newville, where they purchased property and erected a

  large warehouse and elevator and the business has continued in successful

  operation ever since. Although the senior member of the firm died in 1900 the

  firm name is still H. Manning & Son, and has earned a permanent and honorable

  place in the business history of the Cumberland Valley.

 

    In politics as in case of business the son followed in the footsteps of the

  father. He early espoused the cause of Democracy, promptly took rank with its

  most zealous young workers and when his father died was nominated for the

  vacancy in the lower house of the State Legislature caused by his death.

  Owing to the peculiar condition of State politics at the time extraordinary

  efforts were made to elect a Republican, yet Mr. Manning won by the

  phenomenal majority of 1998 votes, the largest any candidate of either party

  received in the county in many years. His public services began immediately

  and under exacting circumstances. During his first term he served upon the

  committees on Elections, Corporations, Law and Order and Judiciary Local, and

  was one of the most conspicuous young members of the House, notwithstanding

  the fact that it was his first term in the body. The following year he was

  re-nominated and re-elected and in his second term served upon the following

  committees: Corporations, Education, Iron and Coal, Railroads and Judiciary

  Local. He was a member of the Pennsylvania Commission of the Louisiana

  Purchase Exposition at   St. Louis; he also acted as a substitute for  

  Commissioner George R. Dixon, at the Charleston Exposition in 1901. He

  frequently takes extensive excursions during summer and has visited Colorado,

  California, Oregon, the Puget Sound country, Canada and other scenic sections.

  Fraternally he belongs to the Masonic order, being a member of Cumberland

  Star Lodge, No. 197, F. & A. M., St. John's Chapter, No. 171, R. A. M., and St.

  John's Commandery, No. 8, K. T., of which he is a Past Commander, serving in

  the year 1902; Harrisburg   Consistory, A. A. S. R., and Zembo Temple, Mystic

  Shrine, Harrisburg, Pa.; he   has attained to the thirty-second degree. He is also

  a member of Lodge No. 163, I. O. O. F., of Newville, Pa.; Camp No. 413, P. O.

  S. of A., and Big   Spring Council, No. 1910, Royal Arcanum, and is District

  Deputy Grand Regent   of the 32d district, Royal Arcanum, of Pennsylvania.